SICFIT Scottsdale Hosts USA Weightlifting Certification

 

Strength in Conditioning for Friday, February 21, 2014

Are you looking to add the USA Weightlifting certification to your resume? Or perhaps you want to become more proficient in your Olympic Lifting? No matter which camp you fall into, you won’t want to miss the SICIFT Scottsdale two day USAW Level 1 Sport Performance Coach Certification on April 5th and 6th, 2014. With the rapid growth strength in conditioning facilities offering the highest quality coaching available, our staff has decided to make it a standard to have this certification and to make it readily available for anyone wanting to learn the OLY lifts from the pros. That is why we asked for long time coach Patrick Cullen- Carroll to come out and teach the course. Register here to reserve your spot today!

WARMUP
3 Rounds
200 Meter run + 10 lunges + 10 inch worm + 10 side lunges
SKILL
Clean & Jerk barbell progression
Build to heavy single Clean and Jerk
LIFE: Hang clean + push press
STRENGTH IN CONDITIONING
3 Minutes on 1 minute off | 4 Rounds
LIFE: 3 Power clean + 5 front squats + 7 burpees + 1 minute rest after each round
FITNESS: 3 Power clean + 5 front squints + 7 burpees | 3 Minute AMRAP + 1 minute rest

A Brief History of Olympic Weightlifting

The genealogy of lifting traces back to the beginning of recorded history where man’s fascination with physical prowess can be found among numerous ancient writings. A 5,000-year-old Chinese text tells of prospective soldiers having to pass lifting tests.

Ancient Greek sculptures also depict lifting feats. The weights were generally stones, but later gave way to dumbbells. The origin of the word dumbbells comes from the practice of removing clappers from bells, rendering them soundless during lifting.

The first modern day Olympics were held in 1896 and weightlifting was included as an official sport. Weightlifting did not appear in the 1900 Games, but returned in 1904, and has been a regular event since 1920. In 1932, three lifts were standard: the press (eliminated in 1972), the snatch, and the clean & jerk. In 1932, there were five weight classes. Today there are eight weight classes for men and seven weight classes for women.

The U.S. men, dominated the sport in the 1930s, ’40s and ’50s, By 1996, the U.S. Team was ranked 15th in the world after a successful Olympic Games performance in Atlanta, Ga. The U.S. junior men were ranked 13th in the world. In 2000, Oscar Chaplin III won the Junior World title in the 77kg weight class and the only Junior World gold for the U.S. Men’s Team.

Women’s weightlifting has been conducted at the World Championships level since 1987. The U.S. women have won medals in eight World Championships and continue to be a power in the world arena. In 1994, U.S. lifter Robin Goad was the World Champion in the 50kg class

Women’s weightlifting participated for the first time in the Olympics Games in Sydney, Australia. Tara Nott, a U.S. lifter in the 48kg class, was the first woman to earn a gold medal in women’s weightlifting in the Olympics and the first U.S. lifter to earn a gold medal in weightlifting in 40 years. Cheryl Haworth, 75+kg earned a bronze medal in the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, Australia.

In 2001, the U.S. Junior Women won the team championship at the Junior Worlds, including three gold medals from Cheryl Haworth. In the 2002 Junior World Championships, Cheryl repeated her performance and again captured three gold medals as a member of the U.S. Junior Women’s team.